Source: Official Guide for the GMAT 13th Ed. Data Sufficiency; #131 Official Guide for the GMAT 2015 14th Ed. Data Sufficiency; #131

3

Six shipments of machine parts were shipped

Six shipments of machine parts were shipped from a factory on two trucks, with each shipment entirely on one of the trucks. Each shipment was labeled either S1, S2, S3, S4, S5, or S6. The table shows the value of each shipment as a fraction of the total value of the six shipments on the first truck had a value greater than 1/2 of the total value of the six shipments, was S3 shipped on the first truck?

1 Explanation

2

Gravatar Mike McGarry, Magoosh Tutor

Jan 4, 2014 • Comment

jeremy coleman

Where in the question does it say that the shipments are split equally between the two trucks? Is it not the case that one truck could be carrying 4 shipments, making E the answer?

Sep 23, 2016 • Reply

Cydney Seigerman, Magoosh Tutor

Hi Jeremy :)

The prompt does not say that there must be three shipments on each of the trucks. However, that doesn't necessarily mean that the statements are insufficient to determine on which truck S3 was placed.

Statement 1 is insufficient because we can make multiple arrangements based on the information given, and in some S3 would be on truck 1 while in others S3 would be on truck 2.

Now, let's take a closer look at Statement 2: S1 and S6 were shipped on the second truck.

So, we know from the start that part of the value on truck 2 is: 0.35

Now, in the prompt, we're told that "the first truck had a value greater than 1/2 of the total value of the six shipments." If we add up all of the fractional part of the value, we get 1, the total value of the shipments. So, truck 1 must have more than 0.5 of the fractional components of the value. If S3 is on truck 2, however, the value on truck 2 becomes:

0.35 + 0.167 ~ 0.52

That is to say, if truck 2 carried S1, S6, and S3, it would carry more than half of the total value of the shipments. However, we're told that truck 1 carries more than half the value. Therefore, we can conclude that S3 cannot be on truck 2 and must be on truck 1. Because we know which truck S3 must be on, Statement 2 is sufficient.

Does this make sense? I hope this clears up your doubts! :)

Sep 26, 2016 • Reply

Add Your Explanation

You must have a Magoosh account in order to leave an explanation.

Learn More About Magoosh

Official GMAT Material

Official Guide for GMAT Review 2016

Official Guide for the GMAT 2015 14th Ed.

Official Guide for the GMAT 13th Ed.

Nova's GRE Prep

Official Guide for the GMAT 12th Ed.

Revised GRE PDF 2nd Ed.


Section 6.3 Data Sufficiency

Section 6.3 Data Sufficiency

Improve Your Score

Magoosh GMAT is an affordable online course for studying the GMAT.

Learn More About Magoosh

Share Post

Email

Facebook